Why You Need To Know the Differences Between Contested and Uncontested Divorce

Divorce

In Florida, any couple that wants a divorce must file a petition for Dissolution of Marriage. If they can agree on all or most major issues, they may sign a Marital Settlement Agreement, that details how they have agreed on all the major issues in the divorce. If children are involved, they may also devise a Parenting Plan, which states the rights and obligations both parents have concerning issues involving shared parental responsibility, timesharing, child support, health insurance, extra-curricular activities, decision making authority and other applicable parenting issues. read more

What Happens in Florida Divorce Court with a Contested Divorce

What Happens During a Contested Divorce?

Of course, the preferred outcome during a divorce is that it is uncontested and both parties are in agreement as to how many assets will go to whom as well as who gains custody of any children. However, this is not always possible, and a contested divorce is the result instead. Plain and simple, a contested divorce is when two parties cannot agree on how to divide marital assets or any other decisions of custody or alimony.  We’ve outlined the divorce process for you.

How Long Does It Take?

A contested divorce will take about 12 months, four times longer as an average uncontested divorce. This time period will vary quite a bit depending on how many aspects of it are uncontested. Note that even a single relatively minor thing that is not agreed upon will cause the case to become a contested one even if the two parties agree on the vast majority of the issues. However, in this case, it should take a much shorter time period to complete than would be the case if disagreements occur with a majority of the things that need to be ruled upon. read more